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Is it real of fake medicine?

Why are fake medicines still a problem in Southeast Asia?

The problem of fake medicines is far from being solved in Asia. The Pharmaceutical Security Institute reported that 1,100 “incidents” involving counterfeit and illegal pharmaceuticals were reported in Asia in 2015. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime has also revealed that Asia has the largest share of the global trade in illegal and fake medicines. So, why does this problem persist and what solutions exist today? Failure to monitor the supply chain keeps fake medicines on the market When supply chain security is weak, it becomes increasingly difficult to trust that patients are being prescribed real medications. Recent crackdowns on counterfeit

pharmacy at night

Want to reduce childhood illness? Let pharmacists give vaccines.

Pharmacists hold a unique position in the healthcare system: they are highly accessible to the public and are the most visited health care professionals. They have long opening hours, a wide availability of medicines, and are spread across wide geographies – many areas tend to have pharmacies a lot closer than they do clinics. Yet, pharmacists are still limited in the services that they can provide, including the ability to administer vaccines. Pharmacists should assume a larger role with regard to immunization, particularly in densely populated regions in Southeast Asia where both child and adult immunizations are being neglected, adding to the

Bangkok traffic

PM2.5 and the Role of the Pharmacist in a Changing Climate

Bangkok entered 2019 with critically unsafe levels of air pollution caused partly by heavy traffic, construction, crop burning, and coal-based electricity generation. The most concerning pollutant in the city’s air is known as PM 2.5, which is small enough to penetrate deep into the lungs and cause respiratory damage. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), air pollution is a serious and widespread health risk, and has been placed as a top-priority threat to be taken up in 2019. We need the help of pharmacists to tackle environmental changes The Thai government responded to Bangkok’s public health crisis in various

The only way to end TB is to involve pharmacists

Pharmacies are the first point of access to modern medical advice and treatment for most people in Southeast Asia, especially the poor and rural. Patients may not go to a hospital or clinic at all unless treatment at the pharmacy fails first. Because most pharmacies in the region are private independently-owned shops not integrated into any national electronic health information system, little data exists on potential and active TB patients seeking treatment at pharmacies leading to missed tuberculosis cases. It’s clear that TB isn’t going anywhere unless pharmacists get involved.  Pharmacists should be empowered to screen, refer, and notify TB cases.

convenience store

New data: Thai pharmacists fear loratadine sales OTC will harm patients

Thailand’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently legalized over-the-counter (OTC) sales of loratadine, an antihistamine used to treat allergy symptoms, which means that it can now be purchased without prescription even at convenience stores. Across the nation, there was a major backlash from pharmacists who do not agree with the FDA’s decision. At mClinica, we decided to investigate this further by polling Thai pharmacists on their thoughts. Vast majority of pharmacists do not approve of loratadine sales OTC and worry about side effects More than 84% of pharmacists are not in favor of allowing loratadine to be sold OTC. The results did not differ